Detox Treatment for Family Members

It can be one of the hardest things in the world to watch a family member go through an addiction where detox is eventually required. But that’s why it’s so important that family members support each other if this situation does occur.

If it comes down to it, family members need to research what kind of detox services are provided at different places, they need to think about when to stage an intervention potentially, and there has to be a family consensus about any benefit from a group therapy or family therapy setting. Ideally, everyone needs to be on the same page about creating long-term plans for detox treatment and then setting up good habits after treatment is complete.

Services Provided

When you research different detox outpatient services that might work for your family members, there are many factors to look at. Location is a huge one. You have to figure out if your family member would benefit from being far away in the cause of addiction, or close to home. These are two significant options, and choosing the right one will make it much more likely for detox and recovery to occur with a better success rate.

When To Stage an Intervention

Many people suffering from addiction who truly need to go through detox process aren’t aware of how bad they are. As a family member, it might be up to you to decide when an intervention is appropriate. This is typically a solution that is only smart when all other options have been exhausted. Interventions can be extremely painful for everyone, and the benefits aren’t always immediate. If the intention behind in intervention does not translate well into the actual event itself, it can destroy a lot of family bonds.

Benefiting from Family Therapy

If one family member is suffering, chances are all family members are hurting as well. That’s why, when someone has to go through detox, it may benefit everyone to go to family therapy together. At the very least, it will be a neutral ground for everyone to deal with the situation head-on in a nonjudgmental way, as opposed to finger-pointing that happens in unstructured settings.

Creating Long-Term Plans

In the end, as a group family effort, you have to create a long-term plan that will help someone that is going through detox. It is never an easy process. There can be lots of tension while the plan is being made. But, after everything is settled, a family that has created this long-term plan together is much more likely to stick with it. One of the worst things that can happen is this a family gives up on one of its members without exercising all potential options first.